Crossfit Charlotte-Blog

Aug
13
Is Your Blood Sugar Undermining Your Workouts?
By Andy Hendel


Eating a diet high in sugar and processed foods could dent our long-term health in part by changing how well our bodies respond to exercise.


























People with consistently high levels of blood sugar could get less benefit from exercise than those whose blood sugar levels are normal, according to a cautionary new study of nutrition, blood sugar and exercise. The study, which involved rodents and people, suggests that eating a diet high in sugar and processed foods, which may set the stage for poor blood sugar control, could dent our long-term health in part by changing how well our bodies respond to a workout.


We already have plenty of evidence, of course, that elevated blood sugar is unhealthy. P...


Aug
11
Deception in Cholesterol Research Separating Truth From Profitable Fiction
By Andy Hendel



Webinar Preview: Deception in Cholesterol Research Separating Truth From Profitable Fiction







Aug
08
What Makes Grass-Fed Beef Different, and Are You Buying the Real Thing?
By Andy Hendel


How grass-fed and grain-fed cattle are raised — and the truth behind the meat labeling requirements.








cow pasture - shutterstock





There’s a lot to consider when it comes to interpreting the impact of our food choices and deciding what to put in our bodies. Conscious consumers want to eat food they perceive to be better for people and the planet. Despite this, access to credible information about our food can seem short in supply — especially when it comes to grass-fed beef.


The idea of grass-fed beef might conjure idyllic images of cows grazing on open fields under big blue skies. Then, after living happy lives, they go on to become hamburgers and steaks. It seems like a win-win scenario. But there mi...


Jul
28
The Toxic Truth About Sugar
By Andy Hendel



Question: What is the basis for arguments to restrict sugar consumption?


Takeaway: Robert Lustig, Laura Schmidt, and Claire Brindis argue sugar is not merely toxic but ubiquitous, potentially abuse-forming, and detrimental to society; taken together, these conditions justify aggressive action to reduce sugar consumption.






In this 2012 commentary in Nature, Robert Lustig, Laura Schmidt, and Claire Brindis claim sugar harms individuals and society in similar ways to tobacco and alcohol. They argue similar measures to restrict its consumption are warranted.


According to United Nations data (1), 2011 was the first year in recorded history when noncommunicable disease mortality exceeded that of infec...


Jul
23
Fat, Part 1: Anatomical Distribution
By Andy Hendel

Inside metabolically active cells, you will find little droplets of fat (more properly called lipid) that can be used as an energy source. Fat carries out many crucial roles in the body apart from being a pretty effective energy storage medium. At the cellular level, every one of the billions of cells in the human body requires fat as a component of its membrane structures. At the biochemical level, a tremendous number of the body’s important chemicals are composed of or created from fats — estrogen and testosterone, for example. Myelin, a chemical made from fat, surrounds neuronal axons and makes neural transmission effective. We have to have fat in our bodies for normal functio...


Jul
21
Lack of an Association or an Inverse Association Between Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Mortality in the Elderly
By Andy Hendel



Lack of an Association or an Inverse Association Between Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Mortality in the Elderly






Question: Does elevated LDL cholesterol predict increased mortality among the elderly?


Takeaway: No, it does not. Across a variety of populations, increased LDL cholesterol either has no relationship with overall mortality or predicts decreased mortality risk among the elderly. Efforts to reduce LDL cholesterol among elderly populations may increase overall mortality rates.






In this 2016 review, a team including CrossFit Health contributors Uffe Ravnskov, David Diamond, Malcolm Kendrick, and Aseem Malhotra analyzes the associations between LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular a...


May
04
Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Health, Aging, and Disease
By Kokila Kothandan








Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Health, Aging, and Disease






This comprehensive 2019 New England Journal of Medicine review summarizes the impact of intermittent fasting at both a cellular and an organ/body system level. It then outlines how these changes may benefit individuals with a variety of disease states.


Intermittent fasting, as defined by review authors Rafael de Cabo and Mark P. Mattson, is a period of food restriction sufficient to clear liver glycogen stores and dramatically suppress glucose, insulin, and amino acid uptake by cells. During fasting, fatty acids are released into circulation and taken ...


Apr
30
Muscle Mass, Strength and Longevity
By Andy Hendel


Apr
29
Vishal Joshi: CrossFit, Healthy Eating "Saved My Life"
By Andy Hendel



Vishal Joshi: CrossFit, Healthy Eating "Saved My Life"





"I was lacking self-confidence. I didn't care for myself. I didn't think I was worthy of a lot of things. And CrossFit has brought that back for me," says Vi...




Apr
26
Diet Modulates Brain Network Stability, a Biomarker for Aging, in Young Adults
By Andy Hendel

Question: Do elevated blood ketone levels improve brain function?


Takeaway: This study found elevated blood ketone levels — whether achieved through an overnight fast, ketogenic diet, or use of exogenous ketones — improved functional connectivity throughout the brain. It also found that diabetes is associated with impaired connectivity. These results further support the link between metabolic and mental health.


The brain is exceptionally sensitive to metabolic disruption (1). Diabetes, insulin resistance, and other forms of metabolic impairment have been linked to cognitive deficits and dysfunction in the U.S., U.K., and Israel (2). As insulin resistance develops, it impairs blood ...


hours

Monday

-

5:30AM - 8:00PM

Tuesday

-

5:30AM - 8:00PM

Wednesday

-

5:30AM - 8:00PM

Thursday

-

5:30AM - 7:30PM

Friday

-

5:30AM - 7:30PM

Saturday

-

9:00AM - 12:00PM

Sunday

-

10:00AM - 12:00PM


 


 

Less

Contact

Tell Us What You Think